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WSummers's profile

Tutor

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6 Messages

Tuesday, July 31st, 2018 4:55 PM

GigaPower Internet (43000 mbps) - Does everyone get this when you first sign up?

Is it normal for the entire bandwidth for the node to be assigned to a single homeowner?

 

They installed a new node in my neighborhood, back in April of this year and I was the first Fiber Gigapower Customer on it. However, it seems there is a flaw in the AT&T software on their nodes, that does not restrict the internet upload speed when there is a single Fiber Gigapower customer on the node. My upload speed would float from 43Gb to 47Gb.

As soon as my nextdoor neighbor had her Gigapower turned on, 7 days later, the software auto-corrected and brought me back down to 1096/1096Mbps.

I called Gigapower Customer Service, to make sure I would not be charged for the extra speed, but they told me I would not be and to just enjoy it. I said, "Okay".

I was part of the 2 year beta in Dallas, at another location, before Gigapower was released to everyone, so, all of my equipment and wiring meet very specific standards that are not even covered in AT&T Support or these forums.

My download speed in these tests, sits normally at 940Mbps, but that is with 22 devices connected. If I unplugged everything, my normal download speed is 1096Mbps to 1100+Mbps.

 

Does AT&T know about this bug in their node software?

 

43gb.PNG1gbwith22devicesconnected.PNG

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JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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30.9K Messages

4 years ago

My last word on this thread.  Two people who know about networking have tried to explain why you have not observed what you believe, yet you persist.

 

I don't care what the speed test app shows, it is  not  possible  to legitimately get the results shown.  You can only transmit data at the slowest speed link in a network chain.  Even if AT&T had misconfigured their network, the data cannot flow through the equipment at your home at that rate, so you could not take advantage of it.

 

Yes, I interjected the Wi-Fi just in case you wanted to argue that it didn't matter that your wired equipment was not capable.  Even using the Wi-Fi argument, the Wi-FI'ed data would have had to go through the Gateway's WAN port and would thus be limited to its max bandwidth of 1000 Mbps and the 1000 Mbps Ethernet port on the ONT.

 

Your Cat7 cable cannot make a 1000baseT device transmit data any faster than 1000 Mbps.  And a 2 meter 5e cable will do every bit as well as a 2 meter Cat 7 cable for 1000baseT.  It won't matter which you use until you get out to 100 meters.  If you had two devices that were 10GbaseT capable, then you might need Cat 6 or Cat 7 to connect them.  But even then, 43 Gbps isn't going to flow down a single link.

 

ATTHelp

Community Support

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207.5K Messages

5 years ago

Hello @WSummers

To fully assist with this issue further, we will need to look over your account in more detail.

I am sending you a private message (PM) to help in this matter. Please check your forums private messages by clicking the Forums Inbox. Locate the PM from ATTCares and reply to my message with your specific account details.

I look forward to your response and the opportunity to help you!

Charles, AT&T Community Specialist

Gpz1100

Scholar

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91 Messages

5 years ago

I'd like to know what networking equipment you're using to achieve 43 gbps when the gateway device interface is is only gigabit capable?  Even if you're bypassing the gateway and going straight to the ONT, the ethernet port on there is also only gigabit..

 

Please explain.

Tutor

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6 Messages

4 years ago

I'm not an engineer, but let me try to explain how it works. I will first say, that I never received 47Gb when I was at the AT&T Beta location but the equipment is the same, but my conditions at my home are different than the AT&T Beta location. I did have to go out and buy $2,000 worth of new cables and equipment to perform 1 year of testing using different cables and devices for optimal speeds, those were 2015 prices, but that same equipment is here at my new home.

The changed conditions at this location are, I am only 1 block from the new node, and I was the very first customer, and on it, and was the only customer for the first 7 days, it was turned on. As soon as the 2nd customer was turned on, I instantly lost my 47 Gb internet connection and it auto-corrected down to 1096/1096.

1. First rule of AT&T Gibabit Internet, DO NOT USE CAT 5 on any of your network, unless you never want a stable speed much above 940 Mbs.

2. Second, if you use a Switch anywhere in your network, use nothing less than a Gigabit Switch, I use several, on my network. I have a 16 port Netgear Gigabit Switch, and an 8 port Netgear Gibabit Switch. I can't speak to the other brands, I just know I have the most consistent speed results on the Gibabit service using the Netgear Gibabit Switch.

3. From the ONT to the AT&T modem, you MUST use CAT 7, just get a short one, if they are close together or 6' cable if further apart.

4. From the AT&T Modem to your router, you MUST use CAT 7.

5. With regard to routers, after going through 5 different brands and models, I found the Netgear, Nighthawk 8000, the most consistent to give me 1000 Mb WiFI and 1000 Mb Ethernet.

6. Ask AT&T to disable your WiFi in your AT&T Modem, if you have the Netgear, Nighthawk 8000, because it has 6 rotating antennas and using a Tri-band signal and you don't want the AT&T Modems WiFi diluting the signal strength or stepping on the other WiFi.

7. At this point you can run CAT 6 to your Gigabit Switch or directly to the machines and you must use CAT 6 running from the Gigabit Switch or Router, directly to the machines.

8. You must verify that the Gigabit card in your machine is not a "faux" Gibabit card. Before Gibabit service became so stable in the past 3 years, manufacturers would mark a card as Gibabit and put it on the box, advertising it as Gibabit, knowing that nobody would have that speed, but they could charge more by saying it was Gigabit.

9. Do not let AT&T install any lower model of modem then the Arris BGW210. If they do, and you have paid for the 1Gb service, request a replacement to the BGW210.

On my Desktop, I disabled the Gibabit card that came from the manufacturer and went to Microcenter.com and bought a Gigabit Card meant for gaming and installed that. My laptop is an MSI Gaming laptop, that I actually only use for business work, but it came with a gaming Gigabit Ethernet card. My desktop is a PowerSpec Gaming computer, that is liquid cooled, but I only use for business as well.

On the laptop, I have 32 GB of RAM, and on the desktop I have 48 GB of RAM.

Both machines have i7 Intel Processors. To be specific i7-7700HQ and higher, are better at reading the higher internet speed tests.

The Desktop is 3.30GHz and the laptop is 2.8 GHz.

They both run on Windows 10.

The images below are my speeds. 940 Mb download is because I have over 22 devices in my home running on the network, when I ran those speed tests.

 

There are no shortcuts on the equipment, I have tried them all. I have boxes of discarded network cables, routers, switches and computers in my office closet, that failed my testing.

 

It's actually a little funny that the AT&T Fiber Techs that have come to my house this year, have made comments that I should be the one teaching the AT&T Fiber Configurations in the Irving, Texas training center, because they were never taught any of this stuff and just have customers beating them up because they never get a full 1GB of service.

 

For those novice folks, if you put in all this equipment and your computer is fast enough and you still can't get 1096 Mbs, then ensure you have things like google drive, icloud sync and Microsoft One Drive disabled during your testing.

1gbwith22devicesconnected.PNG43gb.PNG

 

 

Gpz1100

Scholar

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91 Messages

4 years ago

Ok, I read all that but am still unclear what equipment was used to achieve 43gbps?

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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30.9K Messages

4 years ago

Uh... right.  And they all lived happily ever after.

 

Tutor

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6 Messages

4 years ago

I'm not sure what you are trying to get at.

I told you the equipment.

After your last response, I went back and looked at some of your other posts, and I see you are a die hard hardware networking person. By the way, my pass through, didn't break after the firmware update this year. My pass-through on my BGW210, still works perfectly.

 

I provided the screenshots, to prove my testing. I'm not sure what else you are expecting.

I guess I could add further skeptical thought to your inquiry, by telling you that my speed tests currently float up to 3 Gb and back down to 1.1 Gb. AT&T engineers have watched it, while onsite here fixing niches in my fiber. They usually ask me to run the test a few times, just so they can confirm they saw it correctly and they can go back and tell their manager.

I am guessing I could sustain the 3 Gb if I increased the pipe on my machine end. As my current cards can handle the bursts, but not sustained at those higher speeds. Just like the 47 Gb, I could do it in network bursts for things like the speedtest. My card itself would only allow a consistent data transfer of 1.25 GB.

 

If I had a 5 Gb or 25 Gb card in my machine, I would beat up the network and share the results here, but I don't want to spend that kind of money for a few tests, as those cards are expensive.

 

If you go back and look at the original posts, this was regarding a bug in the "Node Software". It only appears when there is a single Gibabit customer on the node and auto-corrects, the moment a second customer is activated. So, if you are hoping to get 47 Gb magically through some hole in the network, unfortunately, that was not the purpose of this post.

 

If however, you do not consistently receive 1096/1096 speeds, then it is a problem with your equipment, if AT&T has confirmed you have 1 Gb up to the ONT.

 

I hope this helps clarify any confusion about my posts and their intent.

 

Tutor

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6 Messages

4 years ago

Why so negative?

Gpz1100

Scholar

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91 Messages

4 years ago

Yes, I am a hardware person of sorts, and I call ßS on your claims because it's not possible to achieve anything faster than gigabit when the slowest links on the network are only gigabit capable.

 

Specifically, the wan/lan ports in the bgw-210 are gigabit only, as is the ethernet port on the ONT.

 

https://fccid.io/PGRBGW210/User-Manual/User-Manual-3205221.html

Page 25

 
Communications interfaces
 Concurrent Wi-Fi support for 400 mW
802.11b/g/n and 802.11ac
 Four-port 10/100/ 1000Base-T Ethernet switch, RJ-45
 Single-port voice FXS, RJ-14
 Two-port USB 2.0
WAN Interfaces
 Bonded VDSL2/single line VDSL2/bonded
ADSL2+/single line ADSL, RJ-14
 One-port 10/100/ 1000 Ethernet, RJ-45

 

https://www.dslreports.com/r0/download/2297911~a40e7e8a2f52b33ab02af3ae4b382719/7368_ISAM_ONT_G-010G-A__AMT.pdf

page 2, GPON network interface, and ethernet section

• 1.244 G burst mode upstream transmitter
• 2.488 G downstream receiver compliant

10/100/1000Base-T interface with RJ-45 connectors

 

So, take your speed test results with a grain (pound) of salt.  They're erroneous.  Look at the windows taskmanager's ethernet device under the performance tab.  It shows real time raw traffic speed in/out of the interface selected.  I guarantee you will not see anything near 43gbps, let alone even 2 gbps on a 1gigabit link.

 

 

Tutor

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6 Messages

4 years ago

Gpz1100,

It's unfortunate your only goal here is to attack someone sharing their experiences with the AT&T Fiber Network.

The 43 Gb is an anomaly, your obsession with trying to prove it's an impossibility and attacking me for sharing my experience and the screenshots, is unfortunate, and not the purpose of the AT&T Forum.

The purpose of this forum is to share ideas and experiences with other AT&T Fiber Customers.

The fact that I am sharing an experience that you can't get your head around and have failed to perform your own testing on, not just looking at printed guides and saying, it's impossible because the guide says it is, shows you may want to pull back from your pouncing to attack others that share an experience you refuse to accept and are desperate to disprove.

A typical geek engineer would jump on physically performing tests.

No technology improvements in the world would have occurred, if all those people making breaking through accepted the claims from others saying, you can't do that, because I read it in a book, so stop telling anyone you may have discovered a deviation in the accepted norm.

I only reported the 43-47Gb glitch because it's a bug in the node software and AT&T requires I report it here, I never wanted to share it publicly, but AT&T required I share it here, before their engineers would look at it. I found it to be more of an amusing discovery. Which is why I posted it as a question, since I was required to share it publicly.

Rather than getting tunnel vision on the amusing anomaly, maybe take a look at the equipment requirements I defined in detail. After hearing repeatedly from AT&T techs that customers in Dallas, never get above 940 Mb and I started seeing that on AT&T sites as the expected speed, I wanted to share the equipment that has allowed me for 4 years to receive 1096/1096 at 2 different locations in Dallas. It's not the AT&T Service, it's the quality and the exact combination of equipment in the Customers Home.

Expand your horizons and think outside the box before attacking others.

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