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New Member

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11 Messages

Sat, May 28, 2022 12:22 AM

Fiber

AT&T is installing what looks like a TDM PON in our neighborhood. I understand that it will be feed from a central OLT to passive splitters. My question what’s between them interface/modem in the house if anything? As I understand it the fiber from the splitter goes to a OTU/ONT is that in the house or is it in a pedestal?

my thoughts

Employee

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19.3K Messages

2分前

From the splitter (1:32 GPON or 1:64 XGPON) would go to a fiber terminal (ribbon FST, CFST, quick connect CFST). 

The aerial or ground fiber terminal would then have a fiber drop to the residential address. 
May or may not have a Fiber Slack NID (more common to be installed with buried fiber).

Inside fiber then to the ONT which might be 010 (GPON), 020 (XGPON) or the BGW 320 gateway (build in ONT) with the appropriate SFP.



(edited)

New Member

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11 Messages

2分前

So the fiber terminal from the splitter to the in house ONT is a passive breaker out fiber fitting. The term “terminal” can be interpreted several ways depending on your background. Thanks for proving example part numbers. 

(edited)

my thoughts

Employee

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19.3K Messages

2分前

In essence yes, ATT Fiber (FTTP) is just replacing last mile copper with last mile fiber when referring to telco plant using FTTN.

FTTN: fiber from CO to VRAD with cards of either F, K, N or Q. VRAD has power meter, output of cards to copper CrossBox (distribution) to copper terminals (arial or ground) to copper drop (often 2 pair cat3 to provide bonded service). Drop to NID to inside wiring, instead of using multiple jacks as in phone service, use dedicated line (ideally cat5e) to wall jack for data cable to gateway.

FTTP: CO to PFP to splitter to distribution to terminal to NID to ONT.

The major difference in my mind is FTTN requires power at VRAD to convert light at ATT expense before being limited by copper loop concerning speed delivered while FTTP shifts the conversion to the residence with customer paying the electric bill instead of ATT. 

Shorter copper on FTTP after ONT is allowing faster speeds. 
However both copper and fiber plant are subject to same influences including animals, severe weather, fire, human interaction such as auto accidents, digging, etc.

Yet the flow chart between copper and fiber service is the same… individual feed from customer to a point where joined with other accounts (card FTTN, splitter FTTP) to ATT server to the WWW.

New Member

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11 Messages

2分前

My experience in the industrial environment has been serial data on copper is flakier than fiber. It’s more noise prone and grounding is an issue.

Also the training given the installers is a big factor. Copper often is put in by non specialist electricians while fiber terminations is always done by specialists. 

Interesting point about PON saving on the power cost. The optical splitter eliminates feeding power down to the end points. That in my mind eliminates voltage drop and grounding issues. Being under ground corrosion is an issue. 

This allows smaller cable to the end user. They were able to pull the cable using moles and narrow slots in our backyards. On the downside there no signal regeneration after the OLT. 

Right now I have DSL and previous I had coax. Neither was satisfactory. Pixelization and too many outages. Speed wasn’t an issue. A colleague of mine has fiber and is satisfied. 

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