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New Member

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4 Messages

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2021 10:48 PM

Cascade Instructions (LAN to WAN) for AT&T Fiber BGW320-505 To Second Router With Public Static IP Block

I'd like to cascade the BGW320 into my other router that's set up behind it, including managing a block of public static IPs I got. My understanding of what I'm trying to accomplish is to make the BGW320 as hands-off as possible so that the UDMP can manage the firewall and all traffic. I can find instructions for IP passthrough and other bits and pieces of things I need to consider. But I think the public static IP block adds a layer of complication. I've read that I should NOT do IP Passthrough and instead do the cascading thing. Again, I'm not sure and nothing walks me through the entire process that I can follow. I'm new to this stuff and I'm hoping someone can dumb it down enough for me to understand.

Here's what my setup looks like right now:

AT&T Fiber Internet --> BGW320-505 --> Unifi Dream Machine Pro (UDMP) <-- All other devices

  • Nothing else is connected to the BGW320 aside from the UDMP (LAN to WAN). That is, an RJ-45 cable is plugged into one of the BGW320's ethernet ports, and the other end is plugged into the "internet" port of the UDMP.
  • The only adjustments I made so far is to disable the BGW320 wifi so as to not interfere with the UDMP wifi access points.
  • As mentioned, I bought a block of 5 usable static public IPs from AT&T. But I'm not sure how to utilize these. The info the AT&T tech provided looks like:
    • Gateway IP XX.XX.XX.206
    • Subnet Mask XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX
    • IP Range XX.XX.XX.201 --> XX.XX.XX.205

If your network is working fine why do you want to do any of this?

I'm going down this road because I was trying to set up a Plex server. I ran into a "double NAT" issue and nobody outside my home network can access my Plex server. I think the double NAT issue will be resolved by cascading the routers.

Why did you buy public static IPs?

Also because of the Plex server. I thought these were needed to facilitate connecting to the server and that one of these static IPs would be assigned to it. Clearly I'm confused about this. I got it in my head that the UDMP would get one of the public static IPs and then the Plex server gets another one? Or maybe I'm supposed to assign static public IPs to all three devices in question (BGW320, UDMP, Plex server)? I'm really not sure. Currently the Plex server is connected to the UDMP like any other device.

What is your Plex server?

I bought a Synology DS920+ NAS. It has a built in OS that can install Plex onto itself. Setting up the hardware was fairly easy. And like I said, devices within my network have no problems streaming from the Plex server right now. External connections -- say, a friend with the Plex app on their TV -- can see my Plex libraries on their side but cannot stream anything. Ultimately this is what I'm hoping to resolve.

Thanks in advance for any help offered. Let me know if there's any other info or screenshots or pictures I can provide. I'm outside my comfort zone here but am very excited to learn how to do all this.

New Member

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14 Messages

2 years ago

What is the best way to move a block of static ips from small business fiber account to residential fiber with minimal downtime.  Can it be done on a tech support call?  What is the best approach?thanks!

ACE - Professor

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5.9K Messages

2 years ago

Scholar

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4.1K Messages

2 years ago

@browndk26

The answer is most likely no.

https://www.dslreports.com/forum/r33420392-Best-resource-for-static-ip#end

@Jgwentworth

What is the best way to move a block of static ips from small business fiber account to residential fiber with minimal downtime.  Can it be done on a tech support call?  What is the best approach?thanks!

Short answer is there is no way to move your Static block for one account to another account. It does not matter if it business or residential or a mix.

In today's world there is also no reason to move IPs just use the standard IPs tools from DNS-A records, maybe CNAME if appropriate records, and mail MX records to redirect your traffic for you new IP.

Why do you think you need to move old Static IPs in the first place. Maybe a simple misunderstanding of how Static IPs work?

Dave

New Member

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3 Messages

2 years ago

Informative post. I ended up using IP Passthrough and using my router (mikrotik) for all my NAT mappings. I wasn't thrilled about having the router proxy the pub IP, but it's worked fine so far.  But, I  ran into a challenge . I'd like to syslog my AT&T gateway (BGW320-505) to an internal syslog server (behind the mikrotik) - but I don't see a way to do it. When I try and use the public IP dhcp'd to the Mikrotik WAN interface, the AT&T router doesn't accept it as a valid config. Complains "Address conflicts with existing WAN configuration" - which, I guess it does. Any way around this without going to cascaded router and a public block? Looks like having anything sourced from the AT&T BG back into my private wan segment is a no-go. If cascaded router / public block is my only option, is there any downside to it? Is the AT&T BG truly just a router and just passing a static route with no address proxy/manipulation?

ACE - Expert

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35.8K Messages

2 years ago

I thought it might accept 0.0.0.0 (like the Cascaded Router setting will, though I recommend against that road).  Mine wouldn't.  I don't see any way of using a server behind your router other than the Public Static block, or adding an additional Ethernet Interface and dual homing it to the Gateway network.

 

New Member

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3 Messages

2 years ago

okay, thanks for the verification. If I get a routed subnet, and use the cascaded router config - is that a true simple route mapping that public subnet to my device, and nothing in the AT&T BGW's NAT table?

ACE - Expert

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35.8K Messages

2 years ago

It is routing it to your device and is not performing NAT on it.  I have heard others say that sessions are still maintained in the NAT table for the traffic in this configuration, but I do not have independent confirmation of that.

New Member

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3 Messages

2 years ago

Hi @JefferMC,

I echo the gratitude of others for your thorough contributions here.  I am doing initial setup for a similar configuration.  I have been using an IPFire which I am fairly confident can manage the NAT+block-route problem.  What I conclude from your posts is that I would set the IPFire to take over the broadband ("dynamic") address on its WAN side, and also take over the static block gateway address on the LAN port with that network.  My question is, now how do I refer to the fiber box's address in order to reach the web-mgmt interface?  Is it now only accessible remotely through the dynamic broadband address?

Thanks and kind regards,

Dave

ACE - Expert

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35.8K Messages

2 years ago

@Dave7s , not exactly following.  What do you mean when you say "fiber box?"  A BGW320? 

New Member

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3 Messages

2 years ago

Yes, the BGW320.  With multiple routers/gateways I was hoping to actually be _more_clear by distinguishing the one with the actual fiber connection.

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