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Tailgunner747
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Scholar

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394 Messages

Sun, Jan 27, 2013 3:08 PM

Unlocking Your Phone Is Now Illegal

What is this contry coming to.  If you own the phone or contract is out, it should be yours to do what you want with it. Read Article

 

http://techcrunch.com/2013/01/26/unlocking-your-phone-is-now-illegal-but-what-does-that-mean-for-you/

 

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/now-illegal-unlock-cellphone/story?id=18319518

Responses

mendomar012

Scholar

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151 Messages

8 y ago

What about when I go to another country and need to put a local sim card? I don't want to pay att 120 dollars for data that'd crazy. https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/make-unlocking-cell-phones-legal/1g9KhZG7 sign this everyone
Max69

Professor

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2.1K Messages

8 y ago

Your other option is to pay full price for an unsubsidized, unlocked phone.

kgbkny

Guru

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309 Messages

8 y ago

In my case, this ridiculous law is the final factor that has convinced me to only buy Nexus phones from now on. Aside from the fact that carriers incessantly meddle in firmware updates, they now want to tell us how we can and cannot use our phones. Pardon me, but I thought we became owners of the phones when we bought them?

kgbkny

Guru

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309 Messages

8 y ago


@drumn_bass wrote:

When your contract is out and you own the phone AT&T will gladly unlock it for you.

 

d.


Am I correct in understanding that we don't own the phone until the contract is out?

redpoint73

Professor

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3K Messages

8 y ago

Be aware that the law only applies to devices purchased from your carrier AFTER the 1/26/13 deadline.  Any devices purchased before this date are still perfectly okay to SIM unlock.

 

Obviously a law created by politicians who have no understanding of technology (remember the guy who said the Internet is a "series of tubes"?), and just bending to the wills of the corporate lobbyists.  Why is the Library of Congress setting rules for telecommunications anyway???  Media like DVDs I can somewhat understand.  But a smartphone is not a form of media.  Next, the Library of Congress will tell me I can't change the oil in my car, or get it changed anyplace but the original dealer, since that would also be "reverse engineering", and cars have computers in them, too.

redpoint73

Professor

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3K Messages

8 y ago


@mendomar012 wrote:
What about when I go to another country and need to put a local sim card?

You can call AT&T and tell them the situation.  They may/may not give you the code, depending on whether your device is within the "exclusivity" period (up to 10 months after the phone's release).  You also need to be a post-paid account holder in good standing for at least 90 days.

 

It doesn't hurt to at least try.  Then if they don't give you the code, you may need to seek alternate means (borrow an unlocked phone, purchase a cheap unlocked phone, use an old backup phone, etc.).

 

mendomar012

Scholar

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151 Messages

8 y ago

89.99×24
=2159.76 <---- so after paying this much to att for two years they can't just let the phone be unlocked.
kgbkny

Guru

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309 Messages

8 y ago


@redpoint73 wrote:

It doesn't hurt to at least try.  Then if they don't give you the code, you may need to seek alternate means (borrow an unlocked phone, purchase a cheap unlocked phone, use an old backup phone, etc.).

 



There are other "alternative" means, as well. 😉

21stNow

Professor

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2.7K Messages

8 y ago


@drumn_bass wrote:

When your contract is out and you own the phone AT&T will gladly unlock it for you.

 

d.


AT&T still throws too many rules/obstacles up even in this case.  They claim exclusivity on phones and won't unlock them, even if you purchase at the no-commitment price.  They also mark phones as "exclusive" that were released on other carriers.  How the Samsung Galaxy S III was exclusive is beyond me.  Everyone brought out the dictionaries to define "unlimited" when data plans were throttled; maybe I need to bring out the dictionary for the word "exclusive".

 

kgbkny

Guru

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309 Messages

8 y ago

I am still curious about the implication that we don't own the phone until we complete the contractual term. I'd like to see where this is stated in the contract.
redpoint73

Professor

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3K Messages

8 y ago


@kgbkny wrote:
I am still curious about the implication that we don't own the phone until we complete the contractual term. I'd like to see where this is stated in the contract.

I too am skeptical of that particular comment.  Its not like AT&T is going to reposses your phone, if you break your contract.  Subsidizing new phones is just a way to get you to sign-up, or re-commit (basically a sign-up discount).  Don't think it means they still own the phone.  But if somebody has any definitive evidence otherwise, I'd be interested to see.

 

redpoint73

Professor

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3K Messages

8 y ago


@21stNow wrote:


How the Samsung Galaxy S III was exclusive is beyond me. 


Yeah, that one completely blew my mind.

 

kgbkny

Guru

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309 Messages

8 y ago


@redpoint73 wrote:

@kgbkny wrote:
I am still curious about the implication that we don't own the phone until we complete the contractual term. I'd like to see where this is stated in the contract.

I too am skeptical of that particular comment.  Its not like AT&T is going to reposses your phone, if you break your contract.  Subsidizing new phones is just a way to get you to sign-up, or re-commit (basically a sign-up discount).  Don't think it means they still own the phone.  But if somebody has any definitive evidence otherwise, I'd be interested to see.

 


I am not buying it at all. A writer on one of the Android blogs suggested the same thing - we don't own the phone until we fulfill the contract. If this is the case, I'd love to see where exactly this is stated. Moreover, if a subscriber elects to cancel his/her contract early, he/she pays an ETF. The phone remains the subscriber's property.

For instance, when you finance a car, the loan issuer is clearly listed as the lienholder on the title. After the final payment is made, the lienholder issues a lien release notice to the owner. No such documents are issued for subsidized phones upon fulfilling the contract.

aybarrap1

Mentor

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40 Messages

8 y ago


@redpoint73 wrote:

Be aware that the law only applies to devices purchased from your carrier AFTER the 1/26/13 deadline.  Any devices purchased before this date are still perfectly okay to SIM unlock.

 

Obviously a law created by politicians who have no understanding of technology (remember the guy who said the Internet is a "series of tubes"?), and just bending to the wills of the corporate lobbyists.  Why is the Library of Congress setting rules for telecommunications anyway???  Media like DVDs I can somewhat understand.  But a smartphone is not a form of media.  Next, the Library of Congress will tell me I can't change the oil in my car, or get it changed anyplace but the original dealer, since that would also be "reverse engineering", and cars have computers in them, too.


Actually, I still even question the ability to enforce this law on phones even after the 26th of January...at least for LTE phones.  It is my understanding that the FCC passed regulations that prohibit this on the 700 Mhz spectrum and therefore, in theory, the phone can be unlocked how you choose.

 

I agree about the hardware vs media.  This is nothing more than an attempt by AT&T (and any other major player) to prohibit competition and therefore keep the possibility of losing subscribers at a minimum.  Just goes to show how it is not the people (via those who they elect) that run the country, it is the big corporations

aybarrap1

Mentor

 • 

40 Messages

8 y ago


@redpoint73 wrote:

Be aware that the law only applies to devices purchased from your carrier AFTER the 1/26/13 deadline.  Any devices purchased before this date are still perfectly okay to SIM unlock.

 

Actually, I still even question the ability to enforce this law on phones even after the 26th of January...at least for LTE phones.  It is my understanding that the FCC passed regulations that prohibit this on the 700 Mhz spectrum and therefore, in theory, the phone can be unlocked how you choose.

 

I agree about the hardware vs media.  This is nothing more than an attempt by AT&T (and any other major player) to prohibit competition and therefore keep the possibility of losing subscribers at a minimum.  Just goes to show how it is not the people (via those who they elect) that run the country, it is the big corporations

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