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Tutor

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2 Messages

Tue, Oct 27, 2015 2:06 AM

Could someone else have the same phone number as I do?

I have had the same phone number for over 5 years and some how someone else has my number as well. I get frequent calls for someone else and I've googled my number only to find someone else being listed as the owner. How/Why is this happening?

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Official Solution

lizdance40

ACE - Sage

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71.7K Messages

4 years ago

It seems someone else didn't update their phone listings.  I added a new line more than a year ago and am still getting calls for the previous number holder and they will probably continue for a long time.  Especially the collection calls.

🐾 (The following is included after all posts to save typing) I don’t work for AT&T. My replies are based on experience and reading content available on the website. Our answers are honest, but not always appreciated. If you posted personal information, please edit and remove.

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*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Tutor

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2 Messages

4 years ago

Someone as in who? At&t? Ive only recently had this issue...I dont understand how theyve reissued my number when I never discontinued its use.
Anonymous

New Member

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25.7K Messages

4 years ago

I had a simiar experience where someone in an important position in the government put a report on the Internet and switched two digits in his phone number so that I was getting his calls.  I googled my number, found the report, saw the error, contacted his office, but still got calls after the correction was made, from those who apparently had the old copy of his memo.  

Since I had switched phone numbers often, it was no big deal for me to pay AT&T $40 to use their automated phone number change system, and I got a much better number to switch to.

But I'll bet you want to keep your current number, so your best bet would be to try to track down who erroneously printed your number and get them to correct it. 

Teacher

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15 Messages

10 months ago

Same thing is going on with me. It wasn’t until I got my first iPhone through AT&T that this must’ve happened.  I didn’t encounter the problem until I’d had the phone a year or two- that was about 6-7 years ago now.  I’ve tried everything I can think of to do, but everyone, INCLUDING and especially AT&T says it’s someone else’s problem. I’m about to send letters to the FCC and my Congress people.  I believe it’s likely that some of AT&T’s lazy, malicious workers didn’t feel like bothering to check as I have had poor experiences with their “customer service” folks most of the time. I came here for suggestions, so thanks in advance. I guess everything in the world is becoming do it yourself including the things we already paid to have done for us, right? Sad.

Teacher

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15 Messages

10 months ago

I’m n o t interested in switching phone numbers. This is mine: it’s printed on all my paperwork, etc. One of the problems is that the person who apparently shares this number with me is a ner’do-well with bad credit and I keep receiving her creditors’ phone calls on my phone. Throughout the years, I’ve had to be strong-worded with these people to tell them to stop calling me and insist that I am not this person but calls still get through. I am not putting myself to the trouble of switching phone numbers since I have propagated this all over my stationary business cards and everyone of my connections has it. To h-lol with the concept that I am going to pay time & trouble!!!!

Teacher

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15 Messages

10 months ago

Can you imagine the implications of this situation for people who might breach a fiduciary duty or violate HIPAA or even disseminate our government’s secret information to the wrong folks?  I cannot believe the FCC hasn’t shut this problem down already. They might end up wishing they had. I hope it doesn’t come to that.

Contributor

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1 Message

9 months ago

I am experiencing the same issue now.  When I changed my number a few years back, I was receiving calls for the person I thought had the number prior to me.  However, I am still receiving calls and the callers are stating they've talked to this person on my number days ago.  AT&T is my carrier.  I've complained soooooooo many times and nothing has been done.  What can I do?

Contributor

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2 Messages

6 months ago

This is literally happening to me right now. I have had my number since 2012. In December of 2018 I switched my number over from Verizon. Now, my wife can call my number and speak to someone else who has the same number but on Verizon. It is a crap shoot whether he or I will answer first. How can any phone carrier get away with this? Customer care is telling me that at the end of the day, the only thing I can do is cancel my number.

sandblaster

ACE - Expert

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35.6K Messages

6 months ago

How can any phone carrier get away with this?

@thethiccbeard No one is trying to get away with anything. There is obviously some sort of technical glitch. Why they can’t fix it, I don’t know but something must have gone wrong when they ported your number. If your number ported correctly, there is no way Verizon could assign it to someone else. Seems to me you should be asking Verizon how and why they assigned your number to someone else. Perhaps an FCC complaint will get better results.

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

Contributor

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2 Messages

6 months ago

@sandblaster I completely understand. I don't think they are "trying to get away with anything". I understand how it was written would imply they were trying to do something illegal intentionally. I worked with a Gal at AT&T and she ASSURED me that the number was ported over properly. What concerns me is the original port process was abnormal to say the least. The representative for AT&T who sold me the phones on line assigned a temporary number to them. When we did the port, it took 3 days for my number to finally activate. Before that, It would only ring with the temporary number. I spent a few hours dealing with this through AT&T. We even contacted Verizon who assured me that number would have only been assigned (through the FCC) if it were available. The ONLY way it would be available is if the initial port was not done properly. MY concern is my personal information. My bank send me mobile statements to that phone. SMS text alerts. My social security number was sent through an SMS text. All of this information was also seen by the person who also has my number. My frustration lies with @ATT not doing anything different to make this right. This is a HUGE breach of the FCC client confidentiality agreement and AT&T's solution is a $25 credit for me to purchase a new sim card and to re-activate the number. (start over). Meanwhile, I cannot use my cell phone for business matters (which is something I do on a daily basis.

New Member

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2 Messages

2 months ago

I have worked in the telecommunications industry for over twenty years. With mobile phones there are two numbers assigned to every phone. The MDN (sometimes called a shadow number or alias) which identifies the actual endpoint (sim/phone) and your phone number. This is what allows your phone number to move between carriers. The shadow number is only callable within the carrier you have service with and only in certain conditions. When the porting process is not processed correctly, the shadow number can end up being assigned to the actual phone number or the phone number may not get released from the carrier.

Phone numbers unfortunately we're never intended to be able to move with the customer as they were part of a static routing plan that is coordinated between carriers. International is an even bigger mess. The point is, you can have a phone number that can coexist even within the same carrier on multiple phones as the infrastructure that came well after the invention of the numbering plan fully supports multi-endpoint delivery.

Obviously there are significant challenges with this scenario because the coordination of ownership in the public telephone system would be extremely difficult to manage for the carriers. The result of this is in the public phone system everyone has agreed to only permit one endpoint per number. As the technology allows for the opposite, policy doesn't always align with process. When this happens good luck getting it fixed. I have has this problem for going on 3 years and have readily gotten AT&T to at least identify that both my and another party on a network they recently purchased share the same phone number. This is the only reason they could even identify this problem. Even with that, their suggestion was to get a new line with a new number and abandon the old number. They can't rectify the situation (or won't) because there simply is no policy for what to do in the rare occasion that something like this happens (as it isn't supposed to) and can be considered illegal. Do some googling on "DID Slamming" for more detail on why this is such a problem.

The reality is, you should just get an additonal line and over the next year spend the time updating paperwork or notifying people that call the wrong number. I simply leave the phone at home with a message on my voicemail that if the person is trying to contact me call my new number. After I'm satisfied that enough people have been updated, I'll cancel it.

Good luck to you. Hopefully others find this information helpful.

This may not be the situation in most cases. As noted elsewhere you could always just have someone giving out your number or someone who has transposed two numbers somewhere, or even more recently, someone using "DID slamming" to set their outbound caller ID to your number and your receiving callbacks based on those scam calls. But for the rare occasion where you are confident it doesn't fall into one of those categories, you can feel vindicated that you are in fact not crazy. Yes two people within the same network or on different networks can in fact have the same exact phone number... And this can cause all sorts of wierd problems.

You can't fix it. Just move to a new number on a new line.

New Member

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1 Message

@cstephan so I've had my number for 15 years and maybe about 5 years ago (some time after we switched from AT&T to T-Mobile), I started getting calls for another couple (Mark and Debbie) and when I search my number, it is listed as belonging to them. Since I am receiving their calls, does this mean that they are not receiving any at our "shared" number? or does it mean that calls intended for me are going to them? Are these the "all sorts of weird problems" you refer to, or is it something else? I've never heard back from anyone that they are reaching Mark and Deb. I'd say my most frequent problem would be people getting my text messages late.

I'm not expecting you to solve my problem or ever to reply, but truly any insight would be appreciated.

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