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Contributor

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1 Message

Thu, Jan 28, 2016 5:48 PM

Microcell vs. Wifi Calling

Had mcell for 3 years and worked great.  Lately had issues with people hearing dropouts during my calls.  Mcell looks the same as always, all solid green icons (I have the older white version), I tried resetting it too.  Phone shows mcell top left.

 

Chatted with a rep and we turned off mcell and turned on wifi calling and that is working great.  I only show 2 of 5 bars of ATT signal in my house (radiant barrier maybe?  I am in Dallas so no network issues).  But calls work great.

 

So my question is why use mcell if you can use wifi calling?  Am I missing anything?

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OttoPylot

ACE - Expert

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11.4K Messages

4 years ago

This issue has been discussed a lot here. WiFi-C (WiFi Calling) only works with an iPhone 6 or above on the AT&T network. If you have an iPhone 5S or below, or an Android-based phone, WiFi-C is not available. A lot of households are what we call mixed environments. In other words, they don't all have iPhone 6's or they have Android phones so the MicroCell is still necessary.

 

WiFi-C is similar to the MicroCell in that it is meant to fill in coverage  holes, not be a total replacement for macrocell (tower) cellular calls. WiFi-C is not without its issues but, if you have a WiFi-C capable phone, and don't have any other reason to use a Microcell, I would recommend using WiFi-C for in-home use and disable the MicroCell. The iPhone will always preferentially attempt to connect to a cellular signal so if you are in a mixed environment and want to use WiFi-C on your iPhone, then you will have to enable Airplane Mode to disable the iPhone's cellular radio so it will only connect to your WiFi. This is an Apple requirement and not the MicroCell's or AT&T's.

 

Call dropouts via the MicroCell is quite often an ISP-related or hardware related issue and not the MicroCell per se. Keep in mind that anything that will affect the quality of  your WiFi will also affect WiFi-C.

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*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
Avedis53

ACE - Professor

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2.2K Messages

4 years ago

In addition, keep in mind when using WiFi-C that the cell tower signal strength indication on your iPhone does not pertain to the WiFi-C connection.  You should look at the WiFi signal strength indication on your iPhone to evaluate the quality of your WiFi signal.  When using WiFi-C, the cell tower signal strength indication is irrelavent. 

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MicroCell Technical Guide by Otto Pylot


I am not an AT&T employee.

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
OttoPylot

ACE - Expert

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11.4K Messages

4 years ago

^^^^ good point!

Award for Community Excellence 2019 Achiever*
*I am not an AT&T employee, and the views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.
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