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Posted Feb 24, 2014
9:14:06 PM
netgear wdnr3700 as a wan bypass mode with att uverse 3801hgv???

hi guys.

 

i just moved to a new 2 story house with cat5 plugs in every room. i fanally got att uverse fiber optic, and to my surprise i realized the signal is pretty bad(wiireless g only). The att box is upstairs and i cannot get any signal downstairs (living room, kitchen) and for sure nothing at all outside.

i just spend my last 2 days off trying to figure out how to setup my netgear wdnr3700 to function not as a different wifi but kind of an extender. As you can read my tech vocabulary is limited so let me recap:

 

- wifi not strong enough for the house.

- i want to use my wifi router to and plug it to the cat5 downstair to extend the original 2wire wifi

- I even have a second netgear wdnr3700 that i will use at the other side upstairs (i need a strong and fast wifi to use chromecast and more) The regular g wifi from att is very weak.

 

Please advise that i'm not an expert and if you can give me an easy step by step guide i will just love you...

 

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Feb 26, 2014 12:53:38 PM
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Edited by julywashere on Feb 26, 2014 at 12:54:33 PM

Previously Discussed Set-Up (Set-Up I)
For a residential set-up, yes. This is perfectly fine and it's the best way you'll obtain the coverage you want, with the technology you want (Wireless N), without sacrifcing speeds as much. Wireless repeaters, another option, but carry their own limitaitons (Alternative Method 2 below.) 

Limitations of Set-Up I
There are a few limitations to note, though. A) While the access points are capable of delivering link speeds up to 600Mbps (300+300), Fast Ethernet is a limiting factor here. The 2Wire 3801 is only Fast Ethernet capable. So your maximum link is substantially reduced to a maximum speed of 100Mbps. (Which is perfectly fine for internet purposes since your connection is well below 100Mbps, and streaming within your LAN should be adequate, however transfer speeds will not be the maximum available speeds.You'll notice this more if you're doing File Transfers within your network, such as to/from a NAS server.) B) Any 5GHz connections, and Wireless N will downgrade to 2.4GHz Wireless G if you leave WNDR3700 coverage into your RG's coverage area, and in some rare* cases may drop momentarily. (*Rare - based on my own personal experience.)

 

Solution to Limitation B.

You can potentially eliminate the chance of the latter, by disabling the wireless setting of your RG and using the WNDR3700's for wireless connectivity. (If range allows.) You'd then be operating 1 Wireless Network using two Access Points, rather than three. Your residential gateway would still handle all routing duties. 

 

Alternative Method - Seperate Wireless Network (Set-Up II)
(Solution to Limitations A and B of Set-up I)
You can partially eliminate the speed limitation by creating a seperate network rather than extend your current one. (Although this in itself would create other limitations.) In this case on of your WNDR3700s would be set in router mode, and the other WNDR3700 would be set as an access point. You would turn off the wireless functionality of your Residential Gateway. In this set-up the devices on your LAN would be able to communicate with wireless devices at up to maximum Wireless N speeds, and among wired connections up to 1 gigabit. If you setup your router in DMZ+, your Chromecast, and other devices will be able to use UPnP.

Limitations of Set-Up II
You will be on a different Subnet than your Residential Gateway, so your wireless devices (and any devices wired to the WNDR3700) will not be able to communicate with your U-Verse Devices (No U-Verse enabled Interactive Apps) nor will you be able to watch Live TV using the U-Verse Apps or U-Verse.com on those devices.

Alternative Method 2 - Using a Wireless Repeater/Wireless HomePlug Adapter (Set-Up III)
This isn't what you asked for, but it is an available option. This is by far the easiest set-up. All you'd have to do is sync your Wireless Repeater to your Residential Gateway or connect the HomePlug adapter.

Limitations of Set-Up III
Involves purchase of additional equipment. Wireless repeaters are typically placed near the edge of a wireless network and will increase your range a bit, but they are limited to the incoming link speed. (ex. Hypothetically, if your repeater's incoming link speed is 10Mbps, your repeater will only be able to use that 10Mbps for all devices that connect to it.) In set-ups I and II, the network link is acheived by ethernet cabling, rather than wireless. HomePlug adapters use your existing electric wiring. Due to this, they are limited to internal wiring. (This can cause them to not be able to communicate with each other.) Their speeds are also usually lower than set-ups I and II. 

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netgear wdnr3700 as a wan bypass mode with att uverse 3801hgv???

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Feb 24, 2014 9:21:43 PM
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Hello rom,

 

There is a great guide that may help you here

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Feb 24, 2014 9:34:55 PM
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thank you for the help.
i tried it and i an get acces to internet with my own router but it is a different wifi.
i need the router to expend my wifi (and it will be way faster because of the wireless n). like that when i go from downstairs to upstairs i dont loose the signal.
it is very frustrating

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Feb 24, 2014 9:38:51 PM
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This is what i want.

3 wifi router in my house giving only 1 wifi.

1 is the uverse3801 and 2 other one are the wdnr3700.

 

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Feb 24, 2014 9:51:47 PM
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Edited by julywashere on Feb 24, 2014 at 10:02:51 PM

Try this
Change the SSID from the WDNR3700s to match the SSID of the 3801. The password must also be the same. Change the channel from Router 1 to 1, the channel from router 2 to 6, and the channel from router 3 to 11.

 

--edit--

FWIW: Considering the WDNR3700s are Wireless N, if I were only using Wireless N on these routers, I'd probably opt to have WDNR3700-1 on Channel 3, RG on channel 6, and WDNR3700-2 on Channel 9. 

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Feb 24, 2014 9:57:13 PM
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I appreciate your help.

I will try tomorrow and let you know

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Feb 26, 2014 7:02:04 AM
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Didn't get a chance yet...
I'm now thinking if there is a better way.
I need your help guys, do u think what I want to do will be the best way with the best performance???

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Feb 26, 2014 12:53:38 PM
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Edited by julywashere on Feb 26, 2014 at 12:54:33 PM

Previously Discussed Set-Up (Set-Up I)
For a residential set-up, yes. This is perfectly fine and it's the best way you'll obtain the coverage you want, with the technology you want (Wireless N), without sacrifcing speeds as much. Wireless repeaters, another option, but carry their own limitaitons (Alternative Method 2 below.) 

Limitations of Set-Up I
There are a few limitations to note, though. A) While the access points are capable of delivering link speeds up to 600Mbps (300+300), Fast Ethernet is a limiting factor here. The 2Wire 3801 is only Fast Ethernet capable. So your maximum link is substantially reduced to a maximum speed of 100Mbps. (Which is perfectly fine for internet purposes since your connection is well below 100Mbps, and streaming within your LAN should be adequate, however transfer speeds will not be the maximum available speeds.You'll notice this more if you're doing File Transfers within your network, such as to/from a NAS server.) B) Any 5GHz connections, and Wireless N will downgrade to 2.4GHz Wireless G if you leave WNDR3700 coverage into your RG's coverage area, and in some rare* cases may drop momentarily. (*Rare - based on my own personal experience.)

 

Solution to Limitation B.

You can potentially eliminate the chance of the latter, by disabling the wireless setting of your RG and using the WNDR3700's for wireless connectivity. (If range allows.) You'd then be operating 1 Wireless Network using two Access Points, rather than three. Your residential gateway would still handle all routing duties. 

 

Alternative Method - Seperate Wireless Network (Set-Up II)
(Solution to Limitations A and B of Set-up I)
You can partially eliminate the speed limitation by creating a seperate network rather than extend your current one. (Although this in itself would create other limitations.) In this case on of your WNDR3700s would be set in router mode, and the other WNDR3700 would be set as an access point. You would turn off the wireless functionality of your Residential Gateway. In this set-up the devices on your LAN would be able to communicate with wireless devices at up to maximum Wireless N speeds, and among wired connections up to 1 gigabit. If you setup your router in DMZ+, your Chromecast, and other devices will be able to use UPnP.

Limitations of Set-Up II
You will be on a different Subnet than your Residential Gateway, so your wireless devices (and any devices wired to the WNDR3700) will not be able to communicate with your U-Verse Devices (No U-Verse enabled Interactive Apps) nor will you be able to watch Live TV using the U-Verse Apps or U-Verse.com on those devices.

Alternative Method 2 - Using a Wireless Repeater/Wireless HomePlug Adapter (Set-Up III)
This isn't what you asked for, but it is an available option. This is by far the easiest set-up. All you'd have to do is sync your Wireless Repeater to your Residential Gateway or connect the HomePlug adapter.

Limitations of Set-Up III
Involves purchase of additional equipment. Wireless repeaters are typically placed near the edge of a wireless network and will increase your range a bit, but they are limited to the incoming link speed. (ex. Hypothetically, if your repeater's incoming link speed is 10Mbps, your repeater will only be able to use that 10Mbps for all devices that connect to it.) In set-ups I and II, the network link is acheived by ethernet cabling, rather than wireless. HomePlug adapters use your existing electric wiring. Due to this, they are limited to internal wiring. (This can cause them to not be able to communicate with each other.) Their speeds are also usually lower than set-ups I and II. 

Re: netgear wdnr3700 as a wan bypass mode with att uverse 3801hgv???

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Feb 26, 2014 6:22:46 PM
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Just curious. What was the final set up you used?

 

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Feb 27, 2014 7:10:20 PM
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AN IMPORTANT NOTE: It's important to note that the WDNR3700 must each have their own IP addresses (For example, you can't assigned 192.168.1.10 as the IP address to both devices.)

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Mar 3, 2014 9:24:38 PM
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ok guys sorry for the late response.

first of all i want to thank you for your great tips.

i fanally got it right by using my router by doing what somejoe7777 said and also from juliewashere.

So my final setup is very easy:

i pluged my router downstair to the cat5 and it distribute the exact same wifi that i have upstairs.

Meaning i can go from upstair to downstair with my phone or ipad watching video without my device deconnecting.

 

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Mar 3, 2014 9:35:22 PM
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but i have another problem now.

My house is brand new and even with my router 10 feet away from outside my device dont get any signal from my router.

The only way is to let the window wide open wich i really dont like cause its very hot outside and it is just a waiste of my ac.

I am now thinking of a homeplug with wifi that i can connect via the external plug.

The question is:

- Will i be able to change the setting of this homeplug wifi to use it as a bridge the exact same way i did with my wndr3700??? (cost around $100)

Is there any other solution knowing that i still have another wndr3700 that i dont use yet? (no cost )

I count on you juliewashere u have been amazing so far...

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Mar 7, 2014 1:27:05 PM
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Rom,
Sorry for the delay, your post got lost among the older posts. I'm having difficulty grasping why you're having trouble receiving signal from ten feet away. Your walls must be made of metal! :smileyvery-happy:

 

I believe that HomePlugs simply act as bridges, they don't have DHCP and don't offer any advanced routing function. That being said, as far as I know, there are no PowerLine adapters that are weatherproof or certified for outdoor use. It's also worth noting that if your external plug and the plug used for the HomePlug, are not on the same circuit breaker, they may not be able to link with each other. 

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