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Posted Nov 24, 2012
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HD Compression Here To Stay?
Edited by DRN94 on Nov 24, 2012 at 8:58:02 PM

I thought I was getting unusual amounts of HD compression.  Had a technician come over who ran tests.  Everything came through with flying green colors.  He said the compression is designed so that at the optimal viewing distance of the TV, little to no compression artifacts can be easily made out which is partly true when I stand at the optimal distance for my 46" which is 10.5'.  I sit at my desk which is immediately to the right of the TV.  So I'm up close when working and glancing over at the screen.  The compression artifacts are just awful up close. 

I can understand trying to save on bandwidth but just barely squeezing by for the optimal viewing distance is unsatisfying.  I've been up close in front of my friend's TV which has Comcast hooked up and the picture quality has a "wow" factor.  I don't get that wow factor at all with my AT&T U-Verse picture quality.  I've exhausted optimazing the settings on my TV, trying different cables, ports on the router, and even replacing the box only to get the same picture quality.  Honestly, HD should be provided for free by AT&T.  That's how sub-par the quality is to the competition.

A supervisor on the chat support said that the sales department may be able to increase the bandwidth to get better picture but I think he was giving me the run around.  Sales was closed when he referred me so I'll have to wait until Monday.

After doing some research I've noticed many people have noticed the sub-par HD quality all because of the compression with discussions dating back to 2008.  It looks like AT&T is doing little to nothing to try and improve the picture quality.  Their cabling and hardware is more than capable of delivering clear, crisp HD picture but they choose to bottleneck the bandwidth in order to save money.

If AT&T increased their bandwidth 2x for each HD stream, AT&T would be the best TV service provider by a mile.  The compression artifacts are the only con holding them back from being great.  I consider AT&T U-Verse TV as tolerable.  I hate going over to my friends house now because his HD picture is so clear and crisp.  I was embarrased when he genuinely thought something was wrong with my TV when he noticed how bad the quality was.

AT&T fix this.  It's easy and you'll be king of the crop.

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Nov 26, 2012 7:29:07 AM
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mdbyst wrote:

 

I am not guessing and I could make the same assumption regarding your opinions. Im just stating facts trying to help out other viewers not trying to argue with someone who apparantly likes to argue to feel more important about himself.

The person at 500' is on a 32mg profile and the further your distance between the vrad and prem the lower your max attainable rate gets. As the max attainable rate on your line drops the higher the capacites get on your line which effect downstream and upstream bitrates.  Hence as I mentioned before the limiting hd streams as your distance is increased.  

 

Yes these ip based designs were implented to prevent packet loss but distance WILL effect it. Verizon Fios is an all fiber system however Uverse isnt and distance limits the availability of Uverse so you shouldnt post your estimation/guess of how the system works. 

 

Again the quality of the lines are more important than their distance, and that goes the same for the in home networking quality as well.


 

Yes, you are guessing.  Because you don't know how the system works, while I do.  You have 5 posts and registered 2 days ago, and 3 of your posts have posted incorrect information.

 

The root of your problem is that you are confusing line rates with video rates, which have nothing to do with each other.

 

The LINE rate varies with distance.  This affects the maximum total data (IPTV + VOIP + Internet) that can be transferred to the home.  Closer to the VRAD, the line rate is 32/5.  At medium and most far distances, the line rate is 25/2.  A few people from the old days have a 19/2 line rate.  And Internet-only customers have a 13/1 rate.  The line rate also affects how many different HD and SD channels you can tune simultaneously in your house.

 

The VIDEO bitrate does NOT vary with distance.  It is a constant 5.7 Mbps for every HD channel for everyone, regardless of distance (2 Mbps for every SD channel for everyone, regardless of distance).  This is the only rate we've been talking about in this thread, since the original poster's problems have to do with HD quality, in that he believes it's overcompressed.  The compression does NOT increase with distance.  There is only ONE video encoder at the head end per channel, and it outputs a fixed bandwidth stream that goes to everyone.

 

Since the compression does not increase with distance, it is physically impossible for the distance to affect the HD quality.  5.7Mbps is 5.7Mbps, no matter how long a wire it travelled down.  And again, there is no packet loss in a properly working U-Verse system.  In fact, the multicast UDP nature of U-Verse's video delivery REQUIRES an error-free network for proper function.

 

I do not like to argue.  I like to put out correct information.  You, on the other hand, seem insistent on continuing to claim things that aren't true, and like to generalize your basic knowledge of the system to advanced topics to which you're unfamiliar.  If you want to continue making a fool of yourself, by all means continue posting so that I may correct you some more.

 

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HD Compression Here To Stay?

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Nov 24, 2012 9:55:45 PM
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Edited by DRN94 on Nov 24, 2012 at 9:56:26 PM

I've had AT&T U-Verse for over 4 years now.  Just recently upgraded to HD.  We switched from Comcast due to outrageous bills and awful treatment and lack of respect.  I will NEVER go to Comcast a billion years.  I have and always loved AT&T U-Verse's features.  Like I said, the picture quality is the only thing I have a gripe with.  And I'm not the only one.

I'm going to the AT&T store and looking at their demo TV's.  If the demo TV's have crisp clear picture, I will not stop until AT&T is providing me with the equivalent crisp clear picture that is advertised in their stores.

I've been given the run around too much.  I've spent all day waiting for a technician who abruptly cancelled only to be given the run around from him.  I'm not blind and I know the techincalities behind this stuff.  I'm simply not allocated enough bandwidth for clear crisp picture.  I'm also going to get onto a 32:5 profile because my loop length allows it.  Seems like AT&T hasn't been giving me the best possible service available for my location...

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Nov 24, 2012 10:56:18 PM
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Couldn't agree more with the original poster.

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Nov 25, 2012 5:33:09 AM
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I used to have TWC. My brother has Cox and I watch at his house once in a while. I see Directv often at all the sports bars. Uverse is definetly the worst HD picture of the four. I'm not sure I would go as far as to call it embarrasing.

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Nov 25, 2012 5:50:33 AM
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Edited by BeeBeeSA on Nov 25, 2012 at 5:50:58 AM

Most people want the biggest TV without thinking about what it's going to look like.  The bigger the TV the farther away you need to be for it to look "good".  In my home office I have a 32 inch 720p which is about 4 feet from me and it looks great on HD.  Now if I put my 52 inch TV in place of it, it would look like crap because it's too big for the room.

 

Here is a recommended TV size to viewing distance chart:

 

Screen SizeRecommended Range
26" 3.3' – 6.5' (1.0 m – 2.0 m)
30" 3.8' – 7.6' (1.2 m – 2.3 m)
34" 4.3' – 8.5' (1.3 m – 2.6 m)
42" 5.3' – 10.5' (1.6 m – 3.2 m)
46" 5.8' – 11.5' (1.8 m – 3.5 m)
50" 6.3' – 12.5' (1.9 m – 3.8 m)
55" 6.8' – 12.8' (2.1 m – 3.9 m)
60" 7.5' – 15.0' (2.3 m – 4.6 m)
65" 8.1' – 16.3' (2.5 m – 5.0 m)

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*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Nov 25, 2012 7:32:34 AM
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Ish Kabibble wrote:

I used to have TWC. My brother has Cox and I watch at his house once in a while. I see Directv often at all the sports bars. Uverse is definetly the worst HD picture of the four. I'm not sure I would go as far as to call it embarrasing.


I've had Dish and Direct and TWC, if you are sitting right on top of the tv then they all look like crap.  As for UVerse,  the picture quality is just as good as the others and I've had no complaints. I'm on my 3rd installation and I've not had a bad picture quality issue yet.

” Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports … all others are games.”- Ernest Hemingway
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Nov 25, 2012 10:42:40 AM
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I appreciate the effort but I watch BluRay movies from my computer desk and use my TV as a 4th monitor and the quality is amazing.

On commercials with AT&T U-Verse HD when there is nothing but text on the screen and a plain back ground the text is so crisp and clear you can see the individual un-antialiased pixels.  But as soon as more detail comes on screen or there is a lot of motion the compression and bandwidth cap immediately degrade the picture quality. 

AT&T's equipment is more than capable of delivering crisp clear picture but they limit the bandwidth by a factor of 2 than what it should be.  I've done research and other providers use bitrates of up to 11-12 mbps while AT&T is limited to 5-6 mbps.

I'm almost appalled that AT&T is allowed to get away with being so poor with their HD quality.  They cut their bandwidth costs in half to increase profit when they could easily become the best TV service provider by pumping that money to it's consumers.  And if the chat support brings up loop length excuses they are full of crap.  Where I'm at I have over 20,000 kbps headroom over what I'm given in my package.  That is more than enough to squeeze a few more dozen kbps for much better HD picture.  AT&T is simply being cheap.

Like I said, I'm going to go the AT&T store near me.  If their demo TV's have better picture quality than what I'm getting I will not stop until AT&T is providing me with the equivalent crisp clear picture that is advertised in their stores. 

Don't give me ideal viewing distance run around because I'm a foot away watching my friend's Comcast and it's still crisp and clear as can be.  I shouldn't have to settle for sub-par HD because I'm "supposed" to be so far away from my TV.  All I get is bogus excuses for the poor quality.  No consumer should have to put up with this.

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Nov 25, 2012 11:25:03 AM
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Edited by BeeBeeSA on Nov 25, 2012 at 11:25:35 AM

I'm not technical enough to explain to you why Uverse uses what they do BUT if one of the resident experts Somejoe7777 sees your post I'm sure he will enlighten you.

 

Good luck and stay tuned!!

"If you find this post helpful and it solved your issue please mark it as a solution.  This will help other forum members locate it and will also let everyone know that it corrected your problem. If they have the same issue they will know how to solve theirs"

*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Nov 25, 2012 1:49:28 PM
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I agree that the visual artifacts -like blurry halos around each football player except for closeups - really take away from the HD experience. It's not acceptable at a distance - it should be like a "window" into reality - as it does with other providers and blue-ray. It's not really HD

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Nov 25, 2012 1:54:27 PM
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Edited by mdbyst on Nov 25, 2012 at 2:02:06 PM

How bad is your picture quality? HD compression may or may not effect you because it all depends on your distance away from the vrad, which is a box your service comes from outside. The closer you are the less compression and higher speed profile you will be allowed. 19mg, 25mg, or 32mg being the highest with ongoing efforts to create a 4th and higher speed profile.  So the distance is a factor when hd compression comes into play, also the quality wiring performed on your initial install, the quality of your hd cable, and the resolution and quality of your hd tv.

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Nov 25, 2012 2:52:38 PM
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DRN94 wrote:

I've had AT&T U-Verse for over 4 years now.  Just recently upgraded to HD.  We switched from Comcast due to outrageous bills and awful treatment and lack of respect.  I will NEVER go to Comcast a billion years.  I have and always loved AT&T U-Verse's features.  Like I said, the picture quality is the only thing I have a gripe with.  And I'm not the only one.

I'm going to the AT&T store and looking at their demo TV's.  If the demo TV's have crisp clear picture, I will not stop until AT&T is providing me with the equivalent crisp clear picture that is advertised in their stores.

I've been given the run around too much.  I've spent all day waiting for a technician who abruptly cancelled only to be given the run around from him.  I'm not blind and I know the techincalities behind this stuff.  I'm simply not allocated enough bandwidth for clear crisp picture.  I'm also going to get onto a 32:5 profile because my loop length allows it.  Seems like AT&T hasn't been giving me the best possible service available for my location...


 

 

I can't attest to your visual accuity, but as far as your knowledge of the "technicalities", your profile being higher will not change the compression rate of the IPTV, it will only give you more headroom to up your internet speed. AT&T has new tech coming down the pike that is supposed to give them a major boost in speed, but i"m sure most of that new speed will be dedicated to internet access, as that is where they are severely behind the eight ball, compared to the competition. I'm sure they'll add more streams but I doubt they'll reduce the compression.

 

 

 




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Nov 25, 2012 3:08:23 PM
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Edited by SomeJoe7777 on Nov 25, 2012 at 3:09:07 PM

mdbyst wrote:

How bad is your picture quality? HD compression may or may not effect you because it all depends on your distance away from the vrad, which is a box your service comes from outside. The closer you are the less compression and higher speed profile you will be allowed. 19mg, 25mg, or 32mg being the highest with ongoing efforts to create a 4th and higher speed profile.  So the distance is a factor when hd compression comes into play, also the quality wiring performed on your initial install, the quality of your hd cable, and the resolution and quality of your hd tv.


 

100% untrue.  Distance has nothing to do with the HD quality.  All U-Verse IPTV customers receive the exact same HD streams.

 

One thing that can affect HD quality is a marginal in-home network that is causing corrupted or dropped packets on their way to the STB.

 

To test this, download UVRealtime from www.uvrealtime.com, and use the Stream Analyzer at your problematic STB.  Follow the directions in the user manual exactly, and it will tell you if an error-free IPTV stream is reaching your STB.

 

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Nov 25, 2012 3:23:45 PM
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Edited by mdbyst on Nov 25, 2012 at 3:28:34 PM

SomeJoe7777 wrote:

mdbyst wrote:

How bad is your picture quality? HD compression may or may not effect you because it all depends on your distance away from the vrad, which is a box your service comes from outside. The closer you are the less compression and higher speed profile you will be allowed. 19mg, 25mg, or 32mg being the highest with ongoing efforts to create a 4th and higher speed profile.  So the distance is a factor when hd compression comes into play, also the quality wiring performed on your initial install, the quality of your hd cable, and the resolution and quality of your hd tv.

 

 


 

100% untrue.  Distance has nothing to do with the HD quality.  All U-Verse IPTV customers receive the exact same HD streams.

 

One thing that can affect HD quality is a marginal in-home network that is causing corrupted or dropped packets on their way to the STB.

 

To test this, download UVRealtime from www.uvrealtime.com, and use the Stream Analyzer at your problematic STB.  Follow the directions in the user manual exactly, and it will tell you if an error-free IPTV stream is reaching your STB.

 


The quality of your uverse service has everything to do with distance. Once the Uverse signal is transfered from fiber to twisted pair to the prem the distance is allocated for to provide you with an appropriate speed profile. The distance also will factor in how many hd streams you recieve, be it 2, 3, or 4.  There will be more packet loss over 3,000 feet than 500' given both lines are of the same quality performance. 

 

Anyways as you mentioned a marginal in-home network will most likely be the root of the problem for most experiencing hd quality issues. Get that wiring plan and call out a tech! lol

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Nov 25, 2012 4:03:22 PM
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mdbyst wrote:

The quality of your uverse service has everything to do with distance. Once the Uverse signal is transfered from fiber to twisted pair to the prem the distance is allocated for to provide you with an appropriate speed profile. The distance also will factor in how many hd streams you recieve, be it 2, 3, or 4.  There will be more packet loss over 3,000 feet than 500' given both lines are of the same quality performance. 


 

Again, NO, the quality of the signal has absolutely nothing to do with distance.  The person at 500' ends up receiving the EXACT same IPTV stream as the person at 3000' (barring any hardware problems with the equipment or the lines).

 

This is not an analog cable delivery system where the analog signal degrades while it propagates down the cable.  This is an IP network.  IP networks, by design, deliver packets to the receiver with no packet corruption, and ideally, no loss.

 

The system works just like on an Ethernet network: the person plugged into the switch with a 15' cable has no difference in the packets he receives from the person on a 300' cable run.

 

Any actual bits that are received in error by the VDSL modem are corrected due to the forward error correction algorithm in the modem.  All components in the routers and modems are optimized and buffered as well, preventing packet loss.

 

Please stop posting your estimation/guess of how the system works.  There are many things that you're obviously not familiar with, and your posting of incorrect information is not helpful.

 

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Nov 25, 2012 4:09:56 PM
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Edited by DRN94 on Nov 25, 2012 at 4:11:27 PM

I have a technician coming over in the next couple hours.  A support rep found crosstalk between my modem and the DSLAM which could cause a degradation in the picture quality.  Not entirely convinced it's what is causing the compression artifacts but the support rep thought it would help.

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Nov 25, 2012 4:51:14 PM
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Edited by SomeJoe7777 on Nov 25, 2012 at 4:51:39 PM

DRN94 wrote:

I have a technician coming over in the next couple hours.  A support rep found crosstalk between my modem and the DSLAM which could cause a degradation in the picture quality.  Not entirely convinced it's what is causing the compression artifacts but the support rep thought it would help.


 

Before the technician arrives, you may want to download UV Realtime (www.uvrealtime.com) and capture screenshots of the IP/Profile, Error Table, and Bitloading screens.  Post them here in the forum using the icon that looks like a small tree.

 

If the line errors are too high for the modem to properly correct, this could be a potential source of problems, although it usually doesn't manifest as HD picture quality problems.  Usually the effect is pixelation/freezing/loss of signal.

 

But it still would be helpful to have "before" and "after" screenshots for comparison.

 

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Nov 25, 2012 5:20:39 PM
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I already have UVRealtime installed.  I took screenshots for the before.  Waiting for him to come over before I do the after.  No errors were listed on the error table.  Not sure exactly what the side effect of crosstalk would be if no errors or lost packets have been found...

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Nov 25, 2012 5:38:36 PM
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After reading all these posts I am still sticking with what I said earlier about the Uverse HD picture being the worst of the 4 that I have been able to watch. The difference is clear. That being said I will say that Uverse does a much better job with 720p signals than it does with 1080i.

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Nov 25, 2012 6:16:29 PM
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Ish Kabibble wrote:
That being said I will say that Uverse does a much better job with 720p signals than it does with 1080i.

 

Just about any provider does, since the bandwidth requirements for 720p are lower than for 1080i for a given quality level.

 

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Nov 25, 2012 6:52:34 PM
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Edited by DRN94 on Nov 25, 2012 at 6:56:57 PM

Well the guy came and said there's nothing he can do about crosstalk and that crosstalk is normal for the copper wiring they use and that it should have little to no affect on picture quality as long as my modem reaches certain thresholds.  Again he did the same tests as the last guy and everything passed with flying green colors.  The only bad thing was some bitloading drops on certain frequencies but he said that shouldn't impact my service unless it's across the entire spectrum and that the amount of drops I'm getting is normal if not better than most.

He gave me a free HDMI cable and left.  So I'm guessing that I'm getting the best possible picture quality AT&T U-Verse has to offer.  And quite frankly I'm unimpressed.  Mind you I've had U-Verse for over 4 years and upgraded to HD recently after a friend convinced me with his Comcast HD picture quality.

Supposedly the technician's Comcast at his house has worse picture quality than what I'm getting but I'm not really sure if that is truthful.  My friend has Comcast and his picture quality is crisp and clear.  Possibly Comcast's quality degrades more over distances than TVIP does.  Who knows?  All I know is I'm getting the best possible picture quality from AT&T U-Verse and in my opinion it stinks.  I guess I'll have to just tolerate it and hope it gets better in the future.

I love AT&T U-Verse's features for my TV and internet, it does everything me and my family wants but the only con is the HD picture quality.  I've said it and I know others have too.  I've exhausted every effort to get better picture quality and nothing has worked.  I'm throwing in the towel.

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Nov 25, 2012 7:24:06 PM
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There is great HD on DISH , DirecTV , COMCAST and then there is U-verse, the absolute worst HD PQ availabe.

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Nov 25, 2012 8:13:15 PM
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dian1950 wrote:

There is great HD on DISH , DirecTV , COMCAST and then there is U-verse, the absolute worst HD PQ availabe.


Dian1950 aka Larry11 aka Paul 416 aka numerous other nicknames:

 

Comcast is not available in my area. What should I do? As an executive with Comcast, can you expand their coverage area? Since you are such a believer in Comcast as shown by your bi-weekly commercials, I want to experience the superiority of Comcast that you get to enjoy.

 

Owning a computer and not having the internet is like buying a refrigerator and not stocking it with food.
*The views and opinions expressed on this forum are purely my own. Any product claim, statistic, quote, or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, or party.

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Nov 25, 2012 8:57:35 PM
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I can't get the stream analyzer to detect any streams.  Put the correct WAN, egress, and ingress profiles right.  Enabled the gathering of STB channel/Stream Data.  My computer is plugged into the same 2wire DSL modem/router that the DVR is plugged into.  What else do I need to do?

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Nov 25, 2012 10:25:13 PM
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Follow the setup diagram on page 34 of the documentation for Ethernet-connected STBs. You must use a standard Ethernet switch -- you cannot plug the computer running the stream analyzer into the U-Verse 2Wire router, that will not work.

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Nov 25, 2012 11:05:12 PM
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Meh.  I don't think it's worth going through all that and spending money on a LAN switch.  Apparently I'm getting the best U-Verse TV has to offer.  I've given up.  I'll just have to live with it...

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Nov 26, 2012 12:41:16 AM
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SomeJoe7777 wrote:

mdbyst wrote:

The quality of your uverse service has everything to do with distance. Once the Uverse signal is transfered from fiber to twisted pair to the prem the distance is allocated for to provide you with an appropriate speed profile. The distance also will factor in how many hd streams you recieve, be it 2, 3, or 4.  There will be more packet loss over 3,000 feet than 500' given both lines are of the same quality performance. 


 

Again, NO, the quality of the signal has absolutely nothing to do with distance.  The person at 500' ends up receiving the EXACT same IPTV stream as the person at 3000' (barring any hardware problems with the equipment or the lines).

 

This is not an analog cable delivery system where the analog signal degrades while it propagates down the cable.  This is an IP network.  IP networks, by design, deliver packets to the receiver with no packet corruption, and ideally, no loss.

 

The system works just like on an Ethernet network: the person plugged into the switch with a 15' cable has no difference in the packets he receives from the person on a 300' cable run.

 

Any actual bits that are received in error by the VDSL modem are corrected due to the forward error correction algorithm in the modem.  All components in the routers and modems are optimized and buffered as well, preventing packet loss.

 

Please stop posting your estimation/guess of how the system works.  There are many things that you're obviously not familiar with, and your posting of incorrect information is not helpful.

 


I am not guessing and I could make the same assumption regarding your opinions. Im just stating facts trying to help out other viewers not trying to argue with someone who apparantly likes to argue to feel more important about himself.

The person at 500' is on a 32mg profile and the further your distance between the vrad and prem the lower your max attainable rate gets. As the max attainable rate on your line drops the higher the capacites get on your line which effect downstream and upstream bitrates.  Hence as I mentioned before the limiting hd streams as your distance is increased.  

 

Yes these ip based designs were implented to prevent packet loss but distance WILL effect it. Verizon Fios is an all fiber system however Uverse isnt and distance limits the availability of Uverse so you shouldnt post your estimation/guess of how the system works. 

 

Again the quality of the lines are more important than their distance, and that goes the same for the in home networking quality as well.

 

 

Re: HD Compression Here To Stay?

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Nov 26, 2012 12:56:44 AM
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DRN94 wrote:

Meh.  I don't think it's worth going through all that and spending money on a LAN switch.  Apparently I'm getting the best U-Verse TV has to offer.  I've given up.  I'll just have to live with it...




 

Unfortunately you may have to deal with it but it may be possible to reach a resolution.

First of all, I have to rely on the fact that the tech did give you honest feedback regarding your green status.

But you can look over a few things first. Start with your Residential Gateway (RG) i.e.. modem.

The new model is the 3801 and is recommended for customers over 2200' in loop length from the vrad.  This would have shown up on the techs tests and if necessary would have been replaced. Though the 3800 silver and black rg's are fine, if this is the type of rg you have and are experiencing issues I would have it swapped for the newer version.

Secondly, if you look at the back of your rg, are there any wires connected to the green rj-11 jack? It's best if the rg is fed with twisted pair to the green vdsl rj-11 jack. After that feeding the set-top boxes (stb's) comes to personal preference mostly in regards to using CATV or coax.

Do you notice poor hd quality on all your hd tvs'? Are they just not as crisp as you would expect?

What is your brand TV or model number?

Re: HD Compression Here To Stay?

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Nov 26, 2012 7:29:07 AM
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mdbyst wrote:

 

I am not guessing and I could make the same assumption regarding your opinions. Im just stating facts trying to help out other viewers not trying to argue with someone who apparantly likes to argue to feel more important about himself.

The person at 500' is on a 32mg profile and the further your distance between the vrad and prem the lower your max attainable rate gets. As the max attainable rate on your line drops the higher the capacites get on your line which effect downstream and upstream bitrates.  Hence as I mentioned before the limiting hd streams as your distance is increased.  

 

Yes these ip based designs were implented to prevent packet loss but distance WILL effect it. Verizon Fios is an all fiber system however Uverse isnt and distance limits the availability of Uverse so you shouldnt post your estimation/guess of how the system works. 

 

Again the quality of the lines are more important than their distance, and that goes the same for the in home networking quality as well.


 

Yes, you are guessing.  Because you don't know how the system works, while I do.  You have 5 posts and registered 2 days ago, and 3 of your posts have posted incorrect information.

 

The root of your problem is that you are confusing line rates with video rates, which have nothing to do with each other.

 

The LINE rate varies with distance.  This affects the maximum total data (IPTV + VOIP + Internet) that can be transferred to the home.  Closer to the VRAD, the line rate is 32/5.  At medium and most far distances, the line rate is 25/2.  A few people from the old days have a 19/2 line rate.  And Internet-only customers have a 13/1 rate.  The line rate also affects how many different HD and SD channels you can tune simultaneously in your house.

 

The VIDEO bitrate does NOT vary with distance.  It is a constant 5.7 Mbps for every HD channel for everyone, regardless of distance (2 Mbps for every SD channel for everyone, regardless of distance).  This is the only rate we've been talking about in this thread, since the original poster's problems have to do with HD quality, in that he believes it's overcompressed.  The compression does NOT increase with distance.  There is only ONE video encoder at the head end per channel, and it outputs a fixed bandwidth stream that goes to everyone.

 

Since the compression does not increase with distance, it is physically impossible for the distance to affect the HD quality.  5.7Mbps is 5.7Mbps, no matter how long a wire it travelled down.  And again, there is no packet loss in a properly working U-Verse system.  In fact, the multicast UDP nature of U-Verse's video delivery REQUIRES an error-free network for proper function.

 

I do not like to argue.  I like to put out correct information.  You, on the other hand, seem insistent on continuing to claim things that aren't true, and like to generalize your basic knowledge of the system to advanced topics to which you're unfamiliar.  If you want to continue making a fool of yourself, by all means continue posting so that I may correct you some more.

 

Re: HD Compression Here To Stay?

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So there is nothing I can do to get a higher bitrate?  I can't make a special request or something?


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There is no way to get a higher video bitrate. That is fixed for everyone, and has been selected by AT&T to give the maximum number of people access to 4 simultaneous HD streams.

If AT&T eventually increases the line rate for the majority of its subscribers through technology upgrades, then there's a chance that they might be able to increase the video bitrate and still maintain the stream count, but this would be far in the future.

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